Photoproduction of positive pions at 180 degrees at photon energies from 0.4 to 1.4 gev

Dannhausen, H.W. ; Fischer, G. ; Fischer, H.M. ; et al.
Nucl.Phys.B 61 (1973) 285-295, 1973.
Inspire Record 83899 DOI 10.17182/hepdata.32537

Pions from the reaction γ + p → π + + n were analysed in the backward direction by a magnetic spectrometer. The photon energy region of 0.394 GeV to 1.397 GeV was covered by 19 different momentum settings. Data reduction resulted in 74 measured differential cross sections with statistical uncertainties typically from 4% to 8%. The systematic uncertainty was estimated to be ±5%. The data are compared to other recent experiments and predictions of phenomenological analyses.

1 data table match query

No description provided.


Neutral pion photoproduction off protons in the energy range 0.3-GeV < E(gamma) < 3-GeV.

The CB-ELSA collaboration Bartholomy, O. ; Crede, V. ; van Pee, H. ; et al.
Phys.Rev.Lett. 94 (2005) 012003, 2005.
Inspire Record 654179 DOI 10.17182/hepdata.41902

Single pi0 photoproduction has been studied with the CB-ELSA experiment at Bonn using tagged photon energies between 0.3 and 3.0 GeV. The experimental setup covers a very large solid angle of about 98% of 4 pi. Differential cross sections (d sigma)/(d Omega) have been measured. Complicated structures in the angular distributions indicate a variety of different resonances being produced in the s channel intermediate state gamma p --> N* (Delta*) --> p pi0. A combined analysis including the data presented in this letter along with other data sets reveals contributions from known resonances and evidence for a new resonance N(2070)D15.

3 data tables match query

Total cross section for GAMMA P --> P PI0 obtained by integration of the angular distributions and extrapolation into the forward and backward regions using the PWA result.

Differential cross section as a function of c.m. angle for the photon energy range 425 to 550 GeV.

Differential cross section as a function of c.m. angle for the photon energy range 550 to 675 GeV.